Slideshare’s World’s Best Presentation 2008 Competition Winners

Even though a lot of people talk about ‘Death By Powerpoint’, I’ve found over the course of my Master’s that a well done presentation with slides can be incredibly useful and compelling. (It’s not easy though: finding big images to talk to is usually the hardest part!). If more people read Garr Reynolds’ Presentation Zen or Nancy Duarte’s Slide:ology the conference room would be a better place. As it turns out, Reynolds and Duarte were two of the judges (along with Guy Kawasaki, who I’ve talked about earlier, and Bert Decker – check out his list of 10 Best and Worst Communicators of 2008) for Slideshare’s World’s Best Presentation Contest 2008. The winners have been announced, and the 1st place presentation “Thirst”, is below:

THIRST

View more presentations or upload your own. (tags: design crisis)

(Can anyone say “Presentation Zen” homage?) An aside: Duarte recently put up a great post about how to translate Robert McKee’s ’10 Commandments of Storytelling’ to presentations. Those commandments are:

  1. THOU SHALT NOT TAKE THE CRISIS OR CLIMAX OUT OF THE PROTAGONIST’S HANDS (OR, NO DEUS EX MACHINA ENDINGS)
  2. THOU SHALT NOT MAKE LIFE EASY FOR THE PROTAGONIST (OR, NOTHING PROGRESSES EXCEPT THROUGH CONFLICT)
  3. THOU SHALT NOT USE FALSE MYSTERY OR SURPRISE
  4. THOU SHALT RESPECT THINE AUDIENCE
  5. THOU SHALT HAVE A GOD-LIKE KNOWLEDGE OF YOUR UNIVERSE
  6. THOU SHALT USE COMPLEXITY RATHER THAN COMPLICATION
  7. THOU SHALT TAKE YOUR CHARACTERS TO THE END OF THE LINE
  8. THOU SHALT NOT WRITE ON-THE-NOSE DIALOGUE
  9. THOU SHALT DRAMATIZE THINE EXPOSITION
  10. THOU SHALT REWRITE

See the Duarte blog for more details.

Chris Jordan "Visualising Excess Through Large Compositions"

 While statistics can have impact, often it gets to a point where the numbers are meaningless. One of the most poetic efforts in counteracting this is the work of Chris Jordan. His collection “Running the Numbers” takes disturbing stats of American culture, and shows them in a zoomed out infographic. For example, the 32000 breast augmentation surgeries that happen every month in the US are shown by Barbie dolls in an image of breasts, while another shows one million plastic cups, the number used on airline flights in the US every six hours.

32000 Barbies = US Monthly Breast Augmentations

He also had a fascinating talk at TED about his work (view below).

(Via Infosthetics)

Dan Saffer’s ‘Tap Is the New Click"

I've been a fan of Dan Saffer's commentary for a while, having first come across his great comments on design theory on his site site, and then getting his book Designing For Interaction. So it's great to see that NYC IxDA have posted his recent talk “Tap is the New Click

NYC IxDA – Tap is the New Click – Dan Saffer from Interaction Design Association on Vimeo. I'm looking forward to seeing his upcoming book on the topic.

History of the Internet Animated Infographic

This is one that popped up via Infosthetics. The following movie uses PICOL icons (short for Pictorial Communication Language) to show the history of the internet, going back to 1959. (I have to admit, at over 7 minutes, I started to skip after a minute). The comments are worth looking at as well: one perceptive poster points out that it's default these days to show the internet as a cloud, but in reality it's a very recent metaphor.

History of the Internet from PICOL on Vimeo.

Objectified Film Trailer

This has to be exciting. Gary Hustwit, the director of Helvetica, has done another movie, this time looking at industrial design. Take a look at the movie preview, featuring Jonathan Ive, Dunne and Raby and Naoto Fukasawa to name a few. According to the plot synopsis “Objectified is a feature-length independent documentary about industrial design. It’s a look at the creativity at work behind everything from toothbrushes to tech gadgets. It’s about the people who re-examine, re-evaluate and re-invent our manufactured environment on a daily basis. It’s about personal expression, identity, consumerism, and sustainability. It’s about our relationship to mass-produced objects and, by extension, the people who design them. Through vérité footage and in-depth conversations, the film documents the creative processes of some of the world’s most influential designers, and looks at how the things they make impact our lives. What can we learn about who we are, and who we want to be, from the objects with which we surround ourselves?”

Via Slashfilm